Rafal Los

Rafal Los

11.16.2020

Hello again.

In the previous blog in this series, I set things up for you. I explained the three things that I believe are “red herrings” in our industry – and now we’re going to dive into the first. Let’s go for a short, pointed, and honest ride.

There has been a consistency about managed services providers in the years I’ve worked for them. While not particularly comforting, the consistency of failings at least meant that we were all doing it wrong together. There is cold comfort in that.

One of those things that killed me for years is the speed of implementation. Or should I say, the complete lack thereof? In my years with HP, one of the managed services accounts that I worked with directly was grumpy because it had taken over 9 months to get an IDS successfully implemented. Yes, you read that right. Nine months. It’s not like security is a real-time battle of good and evil, and losing seconds is cause for concern, right?

I swore that I’d work to improve this, but ultimately I was unsuccessful. Then I left the company. But this stayed in my mind for a while. In my next role, I was too far removed from this situation to be able to affect it. That said, it never left my mind as my team and I advised CISOs on strategy and program development. The goal was always to decrease the time that elapsed between signing a contract and getting “security value.”

Fast-forward a bit to when I joined my previous role at Armor. The company was touting “2 minutes to deploy” and given my previous experience I thought I hit the jackpot. I’d learn over the next two years why I had been chasing a false dream. I’d recognize that faster is not necessarily better, although rapid time to value is desirable.

So what changed that swayed my thinking? Experience.

You see, I had the opportunity to witness a few “2-minute” deployments. They were categorically a disaster. Why? The answer lies in another question.

“How much protection can you expect from a security tool that does near-zero customization?”

If you answered the above with “about that, near-zero” you are now in my headspace. One of the reasons; and this is personal opinion now, there were so many install failures and missed issues downstream was that we were going for speed versus security. Sure we had it installed in two minutes. But did it serve any value? That was debatable, at best.

The lesson is this – to provide a valuable outcome to your customers, you need to do the work. There is a multi-step process that needs to be followed that I’ll readily share with you, here.

1. Understand your customer, their environment, and their challenges. Without this, you’re applying peanut butter. There are no two customers that share the same strategy, architecture, network topology, and security response needs. This I can guarantee. So why would you pretend that a single stock configuration would do anything but provide for the most basic of controls? I would argue that without this step you’ll be doing more harm than good.

2. Prototype and test your configurations. Once you think you know your customer, develop the defensive model, policies, and response actions. Work hard to identify not just the 80% case but those 20% outliers that are going to cause trouble once you deploy. Here’s a hint – one of the most difficult things to get right is the disruptive cases. The situations where something happens to upset the customer’s ecosystem due to a configuration you’ve made are irreversible – especially during initial deployment. If you can’t get it right from the start, you’ll lose your customer’s trust before you ever get to protect them. Minimize your unknowns; that’s the best advice I can give.

3. Expertly guided deployment is essential. Far too many times I heard customers say, “We got this” and then proceed to bungle everything because of either ego or something else. But I promise if your provider is offering you assistance to deploy – take it. If they’re not, ask why they’re not helping you be successful.

Expect this effort to take you north of forty hours for a mid-size implementation. That’s my estimation. You, the provider, should spend a week of solid work to get to a deployment stage. That’s a far cry from 2 minutes but provides infinitely more security value.

While I still believe that deploying as quickly as possible to get security value is critical, I no longer believe that doing so at the expense of customization and testing is viable. Everything comes at a price, and in cybersecurity, the price for protection is time. And effort. It takes effort, planning, patience, and expertise on your part and your customers. I don’t care how you present it – those are things you can’t rush.

Next up, removing complexity. I welcome your comments in the meantime.

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